Underrated cheap pedals. | Page 8 | The Canadian Guitar Forum

Underrated cheap pedals.

Discussion in 'Effects Pedals, Strings and more' started by chuck_zc, Jul 28, 2019.

  1. player99

    player99 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Ontario
    Try troubleshooting the pedal on it's own.
     
  2. High/Deaf

    High/Deaf Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Location:
    LM,BC,CAN
    Nah, just not so cheap or unrealistic as to incessantly want to complain about it.

    Or maybe I'm just more aware of what a first-world problem is?
     
  3. zontar

    zontar

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    Location:
    Somewhere around here
    Hey, I bought a cheap reverb pedal just over a year ago--and if it doesn't last a long time, I still got my money's worth out of it.
    But it keeps going & going--so that's cool.
    Same thing getting two used Dano pedals for $10 each--more than got my money out of them & if they break down, I would not hesitate to replace them with the same models if I found them for a decent price.
    (Finding would probably be tougher than the decent price part)
     
  4. player99

    player99 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Ontario
    I have some pedals from the 70's that are still working perfectly. TC and others can't make them last a few years.
     
  5. mhammer

    mhammer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Location:
    Ottawa, Ontario
    I'm not entirely sure I buy that reasoning. But let's stop for a moment and consider what has changed about the way that pedals are made over the past 40+ years.
    1) Less use of through-hole and greater reliance on surface-mount.
    2) More reliance on smaller and smaller pots.
    3) Use of 3PDT bypass switches by more and more manufacturers.
    4) Greater use of small enclosures.
    5) Greater use of PCB-mount jacks, switches, and pots.
    6) Greater reliance on automated fabrication methods.
    Those are the things one can easily see. What we can't see or know about is the degree of quality-control and testing any given product is put through, or any given manufacturer engages in.

    There is nothing inherently risky about #1, #4, or #6. I have my own personal biases about #2, and believe that the smaller the pot the shorter the lifespan. As for #3, the more contacts in a stompswitch, the more potential issues and risks for non-continuity. There is nothing inherently wrong about #5...so long as the heights of everything are set just right and no undue stress is being placed on the component or the PCB....sometimes a big if.
     
    greco likes this.
  6. MarkM

    MarkM Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2019
    Location:
    Midnight Sun Estates
    Is there any particular loop selectors you would choose?

    You have me considering one of these.
     
  7. mhammer

    mhammer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Location:
    Ottawa, Ontario
    None that particularly come to mind. Ideally, you'd want something that is relay-based. I suppose it would depend on how complicated a setup and how big a pedalboard you have. For many players, a simple two-loop unit (i.e., in/out, and two send/return loops) is sufficient, and some folks are even fine with a single loop. For others, of course, they'll want one of those larger units that sits at the front of their pedalboard and offers maybe eight send/return loops that can be saved as preset combinations in memory.
     
  8. MarkM

    MarkM Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2019
    Location:
    Midnight Sun Estates
    I bought a Goudie FX pedal recently used and I believe this meets the underrated cheap pedal criteria.

    I emailed Russell on a Sunday with some questions about a toggle switch on the 808+ TS and mentioned that I had issues with the foot switch til I contact cleaned it.

    He got back to me that day with a explanation of the toggle switch and an offer to send me a new footswitch if it keeps causing me issues.

    The pedal is an awesome overdrive to boot!

    I would encourage you to check out his Canadian company website.
     
    Todd MacCulloch and chuck_zc like this.
  9. TheYanChamp

    TheYanChamp

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Calgary
    Had their cheap TC looper which glitches and died. Then had a eventide timefactor where a momentary switch failed. Then have a Empress superdelay that had a momentary switch fail. EHX electric mistress, dead on the shelf. Buddha wah, on shelf. Dunlop wah, on shelf.

    They can all fail regardless of price.

    The TC got my money back. The timefactor was stolen with my whole board. The superdelay I use as is as I'm not needing to change presets very often. The rest I'll fix when I really need them or are less lazy.


    Sent from my H3223 using Tapatalk
     
  10. player99

    player99 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Ontario
    Switches will fail. The problem is when the design of the pedal doesn't allow for an easy replacement. Same with jacks, plugs and even caps. A good pedal will allow for the wear parts to be replaced.
     
    MarkM likes this.
  11. Cups

    Cups

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Location:
    Manitoulin, Ontario
    Visual Sound pedals. Route 66 V2 go for around 100$ and they sound great.
     
    Dorian2 likes this.
  12. Dorian2

    Dorian2

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Found the perfect spot and settings on the weekend with my Boss DS-1. Damn thing had been sitting on the shelf since about 1991. Took it out here and there to fiddle around a bit. Recently read up on how others use it and on the weekend tried a few different placement options among my VS/XO and SL Drives. VS/XO > DS-1>SL Drive. VS/XO and SL are set to just over/under 9:00 position and the DS-1 Tone is 9:00 with 0 gain. I can run all 4 (VS/XO has 2) at the same time or mix and match and it all sounds great. The DS-1 totally sweetens and widens/fattens the bottom end in a very distinct way.

    I'm now calling it 'The poor man's Dumble sound'. It's really killer. Sorry for going on....I get really excited just thinking about it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
  13. mhammer

    mhammer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Location:
    Ottawa, Ontario
    It's both remarkable,and all too familiar, how drive pedals can magically shift from "Yeah, I've lost interest in it" to "MAN, that sounds good!" after some time away from them. I don't know if it's how the pedal sounds, as much as it is rediscovering a style of play that has been on hiatus, and is complemented/supported by that drive.
     
  14. player99

    player99 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Ontario
    I went through a bunch the other day and found some to be noisier than others.
     
  15. Dorian2

    Dorian2

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    For me it was a little of both, as well as finding the right place on my current board. It's also a matter of not having a preconceived notion of where the Level, Tone, and Gain settings should and shouldn't be. I truly believe that might be a big hurdle in the way people approach tone in general. When I first started using the pedal it was through a Peavey Bandit in High School with absolutely no clue on the concept of Gain staging in an amp. I think once you learn how Amplification works in more detail and all the stages that affect one another ((Tone stack)) tend to work, you can make most so called sub standard pedals work quite nicely.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019

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