Surviving Poor Fishing Conditions | Page 2 | The Canadian Guitar Forum

Surviving Poor Fishing Conditions

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Eric Reesor, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. Eric Reesor

    Eric Reesor

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2020
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    As do rats.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020
  2. Cardamonfrost

    Cardamonfrost Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2018
    Location:
    Barrie, ON
    Are they considered invasive in your waters?

    The perch, not the rats :).
    C
     
  3. Eric Reesor

    Eric Reesor

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2020
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    The rats go back to the first sailing ships. The perch and bass are exclusives to the 20th and 21 first centuries.
    Perch and Bass do incredible damage to the delicate balance of lakes that have a completely different ecology. The once abundant three spine stickleback that abundant native cutthroat trout predated upon in Vancouver Island lakes are mostly now extinct largely from over-predation by planted bass, now perch, Brown Trout, aggressive hybridized rainbows and the countless other mistakes made to erroneously "enhance" the once super abundant fish resources of most of the West Coast habitat.

    We all screwed it up royally and I do not finger point on this issue. But those who were here saw the whole show and warned long ago about the unprecedented decline in habitat and numbers of once very abundant and harvest resilient fish of the species Oncorhynchus. I have witnessed and tried to document the decline as have many others who know the truth about what has happened and is still happening to the once unique and marvelously beautiful ecology of the west coast of Canada. As I stated Sasquatch do cry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020
    keto likes this.
  4. Cardamonfrost

    Cardamonfrost Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2018
    Location:
    Barrie, ON
    ^^ that is what happened in Lake Tahoe. Lahontain Cut Throat Trout was the native species, but overfished, and then invasive species. Was declared extinct.

    Now they have been found again, unfortunately because they were "extinct", now they are the invasive species to the other trout that were introduced. No help is being given.

    Crazy world.
    C
     
  5. keto

    keto Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Location:
    Edmonton
    My dad (RIP) was born in Whiterock in 1942, and was a BC outdoorsman most of his life. Lots of great pics and stories, that echo some of the experiences, told of in here. Unfortunately my folks split when I was young and my brothers and I stayed with mom, so didn't get much education or experience. Living vicariously through your stories.
     
  6. Eric Reesor

    Eric Reesor

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2020
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    Quite true. Cutthroat are certainly not extinct as a species. The problems are that in land locked situations they can become locally extinct. Each local family group is genetically tuned to the given environment and is then lost if not genotyped first. Modern genotyping technology is leading to amazing understanding of the possibilities of what can and cannot be done to re-establish environmentally sensible restocking. Ocean based farming of Atlantic salmon species is not the answer to our woes in this regard. We have proved that given the right conditions the local species can be more robust and just as fast to raise to market size.

    Until now this has not been possible to do. If the now locally extinct species had been somehow preserved instead of being replaced or fished into extinction then our technology could be of use in habitat speciation stewardship. I am not at all talking about creating frankenfish but using our minds and labour resources to become stewards of the environment: which in truth sustains us all.

    I personally advocate for an industry to do just this work to preserve and protect what we can of this wonderland that is the West Coast of Canada. Like all industries the pay back is in the doing and the science. Who knows what may result from the effort. Perhaps sustainable harvesting of surprising large quantities of both commercially viable fish and plants. It is absolutely amazing what we could do if we open our minds and stop destroying that which is right in front of our eyes.

    Call me crazy if you like but our current technology sucks at doing much except over exploiting the resources we all share and depend upon but currently employs very few people in an ecologically productive way.

    I am glad you find what I write of some value even if I am a little long winded at times. Indeed, thank you. @keto
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020

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