Learn challenging stuff before the easy? | Page 3 | The Canadian Guitar Forum

Learn challenging stuff before the easy?

Discussion in 'Theory and Technique' started by tomee2, May 5, 2019.

  1. Dorian2

    Dorian2

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Tell her she doesn't understand "the way of the guitar"! ;)
     
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  2. oldjoat

    oldjoat

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2019
    Location:
    lost in time and lost in space RHPS
    I play the radio :confused:
     
  3. Sketchy Jeff

    Sketchy Jeff

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2019
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Except that there's not a clear line that you cross when you're crap beforehand and an expert afterwards.

    That's why the foundation playing comes first.

    If he can strum 4 or 5 chords in a couple of common keys and chug a few barres he could play happily for years without ever hitting 10K hours. And even do a fair bit of performing.

    The fact that he can't improvise fluently in E-flat minor or play all the appropriate diminished and augmented inversions by ear won't ever matter to him or to most players.

    I was getting down on my slow progress years ago when I was in high school. I liked blues and read an interview with Buddy Guy who said he only knew how to play in A. The man made an entire career out of the key of A and a couple of pentatonic scale patterns. Then I felt better. But I still didn't become a famous professional player even though I knew more theory than he did. Go figger.

    j
     
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  4. oldjoat

    oldjoat

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2019
    Location:
    lost in time and lost in space RHPS
    the point was ... it takes lotsa practice to get anywhere ...
    never met anyone who just picked up a guitar, learned 3 chords and started playing like a seasoned player.;)
     
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  5. Sketchy Jeff

    Sketchy Jeff

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2019
    Location:
    Manitoba
    But lotsa people happily play their entire lives with 3 chords and a capo and if you wait to start performing until you're good it won't ever happen.

    I've got a little summer outdoor festival small town gig coming up in June. Dad-rock feel good cover stuff. U2, Tom Petty, Dire Straits, Van Morrison, Mavis Staples. All of them are 4 chord songs and you could do an entertaining basic versions with cowboy chord strumming. One Bros. Landreth cover in there that has a couple of passing chords but it's the exception not the rule.

    I think what you say is right - takes lots of practice to get anywhere - but being a seasoned player is mostly not fret hand technical chops. It includes stuff you can only practice by doing it - being able to play in the groove with others, getting over stage jitters, having your left hand stay in one spot all evening while you concentrate on right hand rhythm, setting up an amp tone that balances with the rest of the live sound, tuning in the middle of the set, etc. You don't learn any of that stuff woodshedding minor pentatonic licks in 10 position in your bedroom.

    j
     
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  6. knight_yyz

    knight_yyz Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2015
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario
    I learn easynstuff but try at least 1 hard thing everyday. Right now it is the intro to Closer to the Heart.
     
  7. tomee2

    tomee2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    Ontario
    music I like is now called Dad-rock.
     
  8. Sketchy Jeff

    Sketchy Jeff

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2019
    Location:
    Manitoba
    you've seen the short movie I assume?

    with ... whazzizname from Alice in Chains

     
  9. Rozz

    Rozz Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2018
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Because I am concentrating on a harmonious family life honey. Plus, all the kids have to do is hit the white keys and it sounds musical. But thanks for noticing...and commenting. ;-)

    There are a million good teachers/players on YouTube these days you can use for free. There are guys who teach basic/intermediate/advanced theory, chords, scales, licks, songs, even how to practice efficiently.

    You just need to figure out what you want to learn, which instructor(s) you connect with best with and come up with a detailed practice schedule and stick to it....which is why people take lessons locally. lol. However if you have the will and discipline you can define your own path on your own time. You would have to put a bit more time into it, but you could pick your spots.
     
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  10. tomee2

    tomee2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    Ontario
    No... but I'll watch it tonight!
     
  11. tomee2

    tomee2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    Ontario
    Good points. It is the discipline that a teacher brings that I'm after, and spotting and stopping the bad habits as they develop.

    I've bumped up my practice time...I was not really practicing as much as I thought I was (I started a diary). This is making a big difference so I'm thinking I'll stick with the teacher i have. 1 full hour or more of really focusing on what I'm trying to learn is really good and I need to do that consistently.
    My son is teaching me easy songs with simple chords which is great.
     
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  12. Dorian2

    Dorian2

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Don't worry about anyone not liking the woodshedding thing @tomee2 . That's what makes you a better player. I'm not sure where you are in your playing but if you can get a couple of tunes together and go play live at an open mic or whatnot, and drag your wife with you, she'll see the results with a great amount of pride in her husband. My wife, then girlfriend did the same to me when I was taking music in College. Couldn't stand the constant reps of, according to her ear, the same stuff over and over and over again...and again....and again. Get 3 or so tunes shedded and give your people a live concert when you have it down tight. Take it as a challenge to your musicval sensibilities and your manhood!! ;) If you want to know what's real bad, when I was taking piano lessons at about 12 years old my piano teachers dogs, who were locked up in the basement, started to howl the entire time I was reciting a Classical tune for her for an upcoming RCM exam.

     
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  13. Sketchy Jeff

    Sketchy Jeff

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2019
    Location:
    Manitoba
     
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  14. Dorian2

    Dorian2

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Yeah. I took the Classical guitar recital for grade 1 for RCM as well when I was a bit older. Brutal honesty sets in real quick. And they hold no quarter. I nailed all the aspects but was given a - 5% because I wasn't using enough Dynamics. Still got 1st class honors but my guitar teacher was like "WTF, you've only been playing Classical for 3 months. What do they expect?" lol
     
  15. knight_yyz

    knight_yyz Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2015
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario
    I just watched a really cool video on this subject. Basically the instructor says there are ego songs and project songs. Ego songs are the songs you can play well and have fun with. They make you feel good when you play. You don't have to know the whole song, you don't have to play it correctly, but if you do play, someone would recognize it. A project song is something that you want to play but will have or are having problems with. You should have 3 ego songs for every project song you want to learn. So Last Kiss and Hotel California strummed could be ego songs, but something like Classical Gas would be a project song.
     
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