Chorus Pedal Poll | Page 5 | The Canadian Guitar Forum

Chorus Pedal Poll

Discussion in 'Effects Pedals, Strings and more' started by 2005fz1, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. DavidP

    DavidP Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    BYOC vibrato mod...

    thanks for the link--did you get the case with the switch hole already drilled or did you have to do this yourself? A pic of switch placement would really be helpful!
     
  2. Emohawk

    Emohawk

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Location:
    St. John's NF
    I drilled the extra hole myself. I put the switch in the top (face) right corner...or was it left...doesn't really matter.

    The only problem with mounting the switch there is there's not much wiggle room in the case. I used a sub-mini SPST toggle switch from Radio S...err...The Source and it's big enough that the board doesn't clear it with the stock stand-offs. I may try a mini-toggle instead for a bit more space.

    If you don't mind mounting the switch on the sides of the case rather than the face there's more room to work with.

    I'll try to post some pics when I get home this evening. I was gonna wait until I painted them but no big.
     
  3. DavidP

    DavidP Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Thanks Emohawk!

    Good thing to get the heads-up on board clearance issues!! Looking forward to any pics!
     
  4. Emohawk

    Emohawk

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Location:
    St. John's NF
    See new thread with pics...
     
  5. bluesbird

    bluesbird

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    CE-2 is one of the best analog chorus out there ever. I'm sure I would appreciate the CE-1 Chorus Ensemble more, but I haven't yet had the pleasure of trying it out !!
     
  6. a Pack of Wolves

    a Pack of Wolves

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2007
    i use a boss ce-2

    old now,but always works perfect and i dig the 'unharshness' of it

    at less than $100 i was pleased
     
  7. rockgarden

    rockgarden

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Originally a Boss CE-2 (which I still own), but now I just use the digital chorus in the Roland GP-8, or the chorus on my Tube-Works 6130 amp. I'll probably start digging out the pedals for playing with the combo amp at some point. I'm not all that picky about *which* chorus, but I do like the CE-2's range.
     
  8. Mooh

    Mooh Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Southwestern Ontario
    The Boss CH-1 has served me well for a long time because I generally don't want lots of chorus and it hasn't overly coloured my tone. That said, there are times when a second chorus setting on the fly would help. To that end I'm acquiring another chorus pedal (Danelectro Cool Cat) to use when I feel the need for a different chorus setting or sound. At the very least, it will give me choices, or I'll put it in the acoustic rig.

    Peace, Mooh.
     
  9. blackspy

    blackspy

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
    After messing with about every chorus pedal on the market I finally settled on the TC Electronic chorus. I don't know why it sounded better (to me) than all the rest but it did.
     
  10. Stratin2traynor

    Stratin2traynor

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Surrey, British Columbia
    I want to try one of those BYOC choruses. Is it really like a small clone??
     
  11. plumber666

    plumber666

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2007
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    CE-1 deffinitely. I owned one for 20 years, and sold it a year ago because I hardly ever used it. DOH! What a mistake....
     
  12. Geek

    Geek

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    As a proud owner (through a great GC member) of one of the 18V original ones, I can certainly attest to this being a spectacular chorus :rockon2:
     
  13. Mooh

    Mooh Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Southwestern Ontario
    I did get that Cool Cat I mentioned earlier and prefer it to the Boss CH-1, though I continue to use both in seperate signal chains. There's something more organic about the Danelectro, if that makes any sense. The controls are simpler too, more like an older Boss.

    Peace, Mooh.
     
  14. mhammer

    mhammer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Location:
    Ottawa, Ontario
    I've got a bunch of chorus pedals. Some are shown here, but there are more than that.
    [​IMG]
    The CE-2 (#1) is made from the Tonepad layout, and is quite nice. The Clone Chorus (#12) is also made from a Tonepad layout, and is a modded copy of the EHX Small Clone. The Zombie Chorus (#4) is a modded version of John Hollis' minimalist design. The Washburn Chorus (#7) has a few changes too. The MXR Stereo Flanger (#11) and the Boss BF-1 (#8) are not chorus pedals, strictly speaking, but can do chorus-type sounds. Missing from the picture is the Line 6 Space Chorus, the Line 6 Roto-Machine, my mini-Leslie and maybe one or two others and some rack stuff. I lose track.

    There are a few "default" mods I generally do. First, I usually install a toggle to cut the dry signal (design permitting, not ALL commercial products accommodate this) and get vibrato. Second, I usually install a "mix" pot to adjust the level of the wet signal mixed in with dry. This lets you achieve a nice subtlety to the chorus tone. Many commercial chorus pedals could benefit from this, and I often think its absence accounts for why some players are averse to using a chorus. Too often it just sound either too in-your-face or too thick and muddy. Dialing it back a bit makes it more usable sometimes.

    Another mod I like to do is a bass-cut mod for the wet side. Thicker chorus sounds come from shifting the overall delay range towards the longer end (e.g., 10-20msec as opposed to 4-14msec). Unfortunately, when you do that, the amount of pitch wobble introduced can be objectionable, very objectionable if you're applying chorus to bass guitar (whose fundamental needs to be rock solid all the time). By chopping the bass content of the wet signal, the fundamental gest moved to the background, while the chorussing remains as strong as you want for the harmonics and higher notes. Adds a nice subtlety, and most bass players report back to me that it makes their chorus far more usable for them.

    Finally, It is a piece of cake to mod the delay range in virtually ANY analog chorus. Chances are very high that the pedal will use a Matsushita MN3007/3101 or MN3207/3102 chipset, or perhaps a workalike. The MN3101/3102 clock generator (or CD4047 clock generator) will have a small value capacitor (usually, though not always, less than 470pf) snuggled up right against it. If you reduce the value of that cap, the delay range shifts downwards (shorter delays), and if you increase it the delay range shifts upwards. In many instances, I find the fundamental difference between many chorus designs is simply which delay range they aimed for. A couple of msec in one direction or the other makes a big difference in tone. So, I often stick in a toggle to shift ranges. Some chorus pedals have a continuous control for initial delay range, but I find it simply more expedient and repeatable to use a toggle, usually a 3-position. The Zombie, Clone and Washburn have range-shift toggles in them. The Zombie, in particular has one range that does slow Leslie sounds very nicely.

    Speaking of Leslies, Wild Bill is quite correct when he speaks so glowingly of lleslies. Tim Larwill, who makes the Retro-sonic CE-1 clone, came over to my place once, and when I inquired, I found that he had never played through one. I told him that he owed it to himself (as does every guitar player) to play through a Leslie at least once before you die. He plugged in and was knocked out. There is a certain chimeyness and spatial swirl that you just can't beat. Perhaps the most pleasing aspect of it is that it comes at the very end of your signal chain, so that it is mapped onto all the harmonic content you've accumulated between pickup and speaker, almost like a post-production effect.

    I did a gig many years ago where I had my Leslie on slow speed to one side of me, and another amp with a slow tremolo on the other side. I don't think I could have been more distracted if I was drugged and receiving a hand job at the same time. Couldn't remember ANY of the words to the songs. There are other pedals out as well, but the Line 6 Roto Machine does a very nice job modelling Leslies IMHO. Ceratinly nails mine nicely in A/B testing. Not just the ramp-up, ramp down, but the grind and the spatial swirl. Note that if you want to be impressed with this pedal, you MUST use it in stereo. Mono usage is like trying to eat a picture of a steak; a long way from the complete experience.

    I know a lot of folks rave about the original CE-1, and the Retro-sonic clone, but neither really do it for me. The Retro-sonic captures all the finer parts of the original (I've repaired one of those for a friend and put it through its paces), and sets aside the flaws. Tim and I have discussed all the various changes/improvements he's made to it along the way, and I have to tip my hat to him, given what I know about what's inside it. Still, I think the original was an attempt to aim for a fake Leslie for keyboards, and the design just isn't that spectacular for guitar. At least not how I think of guitar. YMMV.

    The Boss Dimension C has to be one THE greatest chorus pedals of all time. It achieves this status because it uses two counterswept delay chips. One of them is always flat and the other one is always sharp. The result is a nice thick chorus that has no (or at least MUCH less) perceptible pitch wobble. Just a pleasingly thick spacious sound. Behringer was supposed to come out with their inexpensive clone of it over the summer. Never managed to find one to try out. The Line 6 Space Chorus includes a digital model of the Dimension C (they call it tri-chorus) that sounds really nice in either mono or stereo. The Dim C was not the only analog chorus to use multiple delay chips. Indeed, a number of early Roland and other keyboard synths would use multiple BBDs to achieve acceptable string-section sounds.

    In sum, I find there are a few real standouts for doing certain things, but a great many commercial choruses are pretty much the same thing with a few minor internal changes here and there. Just about any of them can be turned into just about any other. Of the ones I have, though, I find the CE-2 is a nice "meat and potatoes" chorus, with little audible noise. Being able to dial back the wet signal, and being able to make it do vibrato, complete it.

    Incidentally, the Washburn is NOT "stereo". Not by any stretch of the imagination. Basically, what it has is a second "through" jack wired to the input jack, so you can run a cable elsewhere with an unaffected signal.
     
  15. Mooh

    Mooh Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Southwestern Ontario
    mhammer wins, LOL!

    Peace, Mooh.
     

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